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Gravitational Waves Detected

LIGO scientist David Reitze takes us on a 1.3 billion year journey that begins with the violent merger of two black holes in the distant universe. The event produced gravitational waves, tiny ripples in the fabric of space and time, which LIGO detected on September 14, 2015, as they passed Earth.
Credit: LIGO / SXS Collaboration / R. Hurt and T. Pyle
On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC t…

Daniel Tamayo is the recipient of the 2015 Jeffrey L. Bishop Fellowship

Daniel Tamayo was awarded the Bishop fellowship for his work in orbital dynamics, particularly his recent research elucidating how forming planetary systems evolve to create the diversity of orbital architectures we observe around other stars today.

In the last twenty years, researchers have discovered thousands of planets orbiting other stars. The results are surprising, with about half of…

Star Men at Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

A documentary sponsored by CITA, the Dunlap Institute, and the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics will be playing at the Bloor Hot Doc Cinema in Toronto in the coming weeks.

Written and directed by Alison Rose, the film follows four prominent astronomers on a trip down memory lane during a road trip through southwestern United States. A Q&A session with the director…

Professor J. Richard Bond Receives an Honorary Degree from SMU

On January 23, 2016, CITA Professor J. Richard Bond was one of two exemplary individuals presented with an honorary degree from Saint Mary’s University. He was bestowed a Doctor of Science, Honoris Causa degree from SMU to recognize his outstanding contributions to the field of cosmology.
A glowing account of Prof. Bond’s many accomplishments was published on SMU’s news webpage. SMU’s president…

New Light Shed on the Fast Radio Burst Mystery

NRAO Fast Radio Burst Press Release Video from NRAO Outreach on Vimeo.

Kiyoshi Masui speaks to Nature Podcast about the team’s recent findings.

A team of astronomers, led by the former CITA graduate student Kiyoshi Masui, and including current CITA professor Ue-Li Pen, have uncovered the most detailed record of a Fast Radio Burst…

NASA’s Swift and NuSTAR: Black Hole Has Major Flare

CITA National Fellow Dan Wilkins of St. Mary’s University was recently the lead author of a paper that more deeply characterizes the behaviour of supermassive black holes. The results from the observations by NASA’s Explorer missions Swift and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) could “help us understand how supermassive black holes power some of the brightest objects in t…

Sackler Lecture: The Fourth Paradigm – How Big Data is Changing Science

Sackler Speaker: Alexander Szalay (Johns Hopkins University)

Abstract: The talk will describe how science is changing as a result of the vast amounts of data we are collecting from gene sequencers to telescopes and supercomputers. This “Fourth Paradigm of Science”, predicted by Jim Gray, is moving at full speed, and is transforming one scientific area after…

SXS Simulation Video Featured on BBC Earth

BBC Earth recently featured a video that simulates the collision of two black holes, produced by the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes (SXS) collaboration.

Black holes are formed by the collapse of massive stars; their gravitational pull is so strong that not even light can escape. If they occur in pairs, they emit intense gravitational energy, causing them to spiral inwards and eventually…

CITA Jamboree 2015

The annual CITA Jamboree not only provides a compact overview of the exciting happenings at CITA to our incoming students and postdocs, but also gives CITAzens a chance to share their research with U of T’s astronomy/astrophysics/physics community.

This year, the Jamboree took place on Wed, Oct 7, 2015. We had a great turnout of students, postdocs, and faculty from various fields who listened…

A new part of the time-domain radio sky

By: Liam Connor and Robert Main

(Image Credit: Andre Recnik; Click to enlarge) The first VLBI image of a pulsar’s scattering screen revealed a linear structure in the sky. This is believed to possibly due to refraction at grazing incidence of current sheets in the ISM, where ripples in the sheets cause an enhanced bending of the light from the pulsar. Analogously, a star’s light along t…

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